Peggy Farber, CRS, CIPS, TRC - oldCape Sotheby’s International Real Estate


A home inspection is a crucial part of the homebuying process. At this point, a home inspector will walk through a house with you and examine the property inside and out. If a home inspector identifies underlying problems with a residence, these issues could put your purchase in jeopardy. On the other hand, if a home inspection reveals that there are no major problems with a residence, you may feel comfortable proceeding with a purchase.

Ultimately, how a homebuyer approaches a property inspection can have far-flung effects. For those who want to achieve the best-possible home inspection results, we're here to help you get ready for a house inspection.

Let's take a look at three tips to ensure you know exactly how to approach a house inspection.

1. Prepare for the Best- and Worst-Case Scenarios

Regardless of how a home inspection turns out, you need to be ready. That way, you'll have a plan in place to act quickly, even in the worst-case scenario.

In the best-case scenario after a house inspection, you likely will take a step forward in your quest to complete a home purchase. Conversely, in the worst-case scenario following a home inspection, you may rescind your offer to purchase a house and reenter the real estate market.

It also is important to remember that you can always walk away from a house sale if an inspection reveals there are significant problems with a residence. For a homebuyer, it is paramount to feel comfortable with a house after an inspection. If a home raises lots of red flags during an inspection, a buyer should have no trouble removing his or her offer to purchase a house.

2. Ask Plenty of Questions

A home inspector is a property expert who can provide insights into the condition of a residence. Thus, you should rely on this property expert as much as possible.

Don't hesitate to discuss a home with an inspector. Because if you ask lots of questions during a home inspection, you may be able to receive comprehensive property insights that you may struggle to obtain elsewhere.

3. Analyze the Inspection Results Closely

Following a home inspection, you'll receive a report that details a property inspector's findings. Review this report closely, and if you have follow-up questions about it, reach out to the inspector that provided the report.

Lastly, as you look for ways to streamline the homebuying journey, you should work with a knowledgeable real estate agent. This housing market professional can put you in touch with the top home inspectors in your city or town. Plus, if you want to request home repairs or a reduced price on a house after an inspection, a real estate agent will negotiate with a seller's agent on your behalf.

Let's not forget about the support that a real estate agent provides at other points in the homebuying journey, either. If you ever have concerns or questions during the homebuying journey, a real estate agent will respond to them at your convenience.

Prepare for a home inspection, and you can use this evaluation to gain the insights you need to make an informed homebuying decision.


Most buyers understand the importance of getting a home inspection before purchasing a property. But did you know that some sellers are also opting to invest in a pre-inspection? These savvy homeowners realize that a pre-inspection can be a very helpful tool when it comes time to market their houses. If you're thinking about putting your property on the market, you might want to consider following their lead. The following are four ways that a pre-home inspection could benefit you during the sale of your house.

To Avoid Surprises

Imagine this scenario: You thought that your house was as good as sold, but then the buyer's home inspection reveals a major defect. The problem is worrisome enough that your buyer decides to back out of their sales contract. Now, you're having to put your house back on the market. If you had opted for a pre-inspection, chances are high that your inspector would have discovered the defect and you could have addressed it before listing your property.

Could Help with Your Sales Budget

Getting a pre-inspection report can also help you determine the best way to spend your money while readying your house for the market. For example, you may be thinking of paying to professionally stage your home. But if a pre-inspection turns up several defects that could impede the sale of your house, it would make more sense to channel your money towards necessary repairs.

To Save Money on Repairs

Buyers often add a clause in their sales contract that requires any issues discovered during their home inspection -- even minor ones -- to be repaired by a professional contractor. This can often be unnecessarily expensive. A running toilet, for instance, discovered during a pre-inspection can usually be fixed easily, cheaply and satisfactorily to code by a handyman or even by the homeowner. But a buyer may require the seller to use a plumbing contractor to fix the very same problem if it is written up in their home inspector's report.

Help You Determine Your Sales Price

A pre-inspection report can also provide you and your agent with important information that can help you to accurately price your property. If, for example, your house has some minor issues, such as an aging roof, that you don't want to fix, you can decide to price your home accordingly.

Cons

While there are many positive reasons for having a pre-inspection performed on your home, there are some cons, too, including:

  • A pre-inspection typically costs several hundred dollars
  • You may be obligated to disclose any defects discovered during the pre-inspection to potential buyers

If you're thinking about selling or buying a home, contact me. I would love to talk to you about my services and how I can help you better navigate the home buying or selling process.


There is a lot that goes into the buying and selling of a home Not only are there many steps to take but it can feel like there is a report for everything. It’s easy to forget what they are or why they are necessary.

Three processes that seem similar to home buyers are the home inspection, comparative market analysis, and the appraisal.

Here’s what each them is and how they are different:

First, let’s look at the home inspection.

The home inspection

What it is:

This is probably the one you are most familiar with and have heard the most about. During a home inspection, an inspector is paid to come and test all of the appliances, outlets, plumbing as well as the heating and cooling system.

What this information is for:  

This information is for you the buyer, It is to help make a well-informed decision as to whether the investment you are making is worth the current state of the home. Whether there be repairs that will have to be made or replacements that will need to happen down the line.

The custom market analysis or CMA

What it is:

A sales report your real estate compiles using data they have exclusive access to. This data is compiled into a database used solely by other real estate agents.

What this information is for:

A CMA is used by you and your agent to determine if an asking/selling price is fair. You’ll be able to compare the pricing to other listings and conclude whether it is higher, lower or on par with other offers. This is incredibly useful no matter which end of the spectrum you plan on selling or buying.

An appraisal

What it is: A licensed appraiser comes to visit the home and inspect it solely for value. This is determined by the location, state of and surroundings of the home. Your potential home will be compared to other similar properties in the area to come to a conclusive value.

What this information is for:

The final approval of your mortgage terms by your lender. If the determined value is much lower than your offering price you can be declined a mortgage.

As you can see, each of these processes has varying impact on the final purchase of your home. The information obtained from a home inspection is up to solely your discretion. That gathered from the CMA helps you to determine where the asking price of a home is sitting in comparison to others on the market. And in turn, whether you’ve got a really great deal on your hands or an inflated price. And lastly, perhaps the most important is the appraisal. The information gathered from this process is what your lender uses to determined whether or not to lend you the requested amount.




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