Posted by Peggy Farber on 2/28/2018

Anyone who’s ever been in an outdated house or hotel room can tell you that the way we decorate can have an effect on our mood. Certain colors, lack of lighting, and cluttered rooms are all things that, whether we realize it or not, can have a negative effect on our mood and productivity.

These concepts aren’t recent realizations. In ancient China and India, concepts of architecture and decorating have been teaching proper design techniques for thousands of years. Today, these schools of thought are often lumped into the field of environmental psychology.

In today’s post, I’m going to talk about a few design techniques that will help you and your houseguests feel more welcome in your home and create a tone that matches your desires, whether that’s relaxed or energized.

The effects of color

With a quick Google search, you’ll find hundreds of articles discussing the psychological effects of colors. What many fail to mention is the way these effects are based on things like the culture and time period we grow up in.

However, you may find that guests to your home will feel more comfortable in light, neutral- colored rooms than they will in a room that’s painted bold colors.

On a room-by-room basis, there tend to be certain colors that Americans associate with the “right” colors for the occasion.

However, this is often influenced by the architectural style of the house more than an internalized idea about specific colors.

How much is too much?

It’s easy to accumulate home decor and find your walls and surface becoming a little too cluttered. However, bare walls and sparsely decorated rooms can feel a bit too sterile and unlivable. Is there a balance between the two?

Oftentimes the best solution is to follow one simple decorating principle:

Rather than using several small items to decorate a room, choose just a few larger items. This will prevent the room from appearing cluttered but still give it a sense of character.

Taking advantage of the full area of a room

So far, we’ve been talking about how colors and decor can make a room feel more spacious and welcoming. But, even if you have a small room, you can still often achieve this effect.

One solution is to add brighter lighting to the room. Increasing the light makes to room feel more open. And, if possible, natural lighting is the best option, as it can reduce any feelings of claustrophobia.

If better lighting or windows aren’t an option, many homeowners turn to mirrors to make a room feel larger. Larger, wall-hanging mirrors are an excellent way to give the illusion of spaciousness in a small room.

Using the psychology behind these three decorating principles, you’ll be able to make you and your houseguests feel more at ease within your home.

Posted by Peggy Farber on 2/21/2018

People often talk about boosting the value of their home with various improvements. But it is seldom that you hear anyone talk about the unforeseen factors that devalue their home. Furthermore, there are some fluctuations in a home's market value or appraisal value that are out of the homeowner's hands. In this post, we'll break down some of the broader aspects of home value and determine which "improvements" will serve you best in the long run. We'll also point out the red flags that are sure to devalue a home on the market.


Few things so greatly affect the value of your home as location. If you happened to buy a house in Brooklyn Heights a couple decades ago its value has probably gone up exponentially since then due to the high demand of living in a trendy part of New York. Aside from living in the hippest neighborhood, people choose their home based on other location factors. Schools, hospitals, shopping centers, vicinity to highways or public transportation may all play a big role for many people. Location factors that will negatively affect the value of your home are high or increasing crime rates, economic decline (boarded up stores aren't very appealing to home buyers), a high incidence of registered sex offenders nearby, and neighbors that have unkempt homes or hoard junk in their yards. Other location factors are harder to sniff out. With the exception city dumps or waste processing centers--which you won't have any trouble smelling--having undesirable places like power plants or noisy freeways in your neighborhood can also devalue your home.

Inside the home

Home improvements are a great way to increase the value of your home--as long as those improvements meet a few criteria. Any changes you make should be legal and up to code. Potential buyers do not want the liability of illegal home improvements, nor can they ensure that the job was safely done and doesn't put them and their family at risk. Your improvements should also be up to social standards and changing tastes. Yes, we all have our own preferences when it comes to paint colors and home decorations. But when trying to sell a home it's important that it doesn't look like a time capsule from the 70s, rife with wood panels and shag carpets. When it comes to home repairs many homeowners elect to put off big projects because they are daunting and time consuming. Instead they focus on surface level improvements that might not do much to improve the value of their home. If you have plumbing that needs to be replaced, deteriorating flooring, or faulty heating and ventilation, make sure you take care of those before putting your home on the market.

Ask the pros

If buying or selling a home is in your foreseeable future, one great way to get a jump on your research is to consult a real estate agent and a building contractor to learn more about your area's own unique market values. This will give you a head start on making changes to your home and will tip you off on what to look out for when home hunting.

Posted by Peggy Farber on 2/14/2018

Let's face it – homebuyers constantly compete with one another, especially if a new home is added to the real estate market that fulfills the requests of a large assortment of homebuyers in a particular area. Thus, you'll want to do whatever you can to gain a competitive advantage over other homebuyers, as this competitive edge will enable you to discover the right home quickly and efficiently. So what does it take to obtain a competitive advantage over your homebuying rivals? Here are three tips to help you gain a competitive edge over homebuyers in any real estate market: 1. Act Fast. The early bird catches the worm, and the same holds true for homebuyers who want to find the best homes in a competitive real estate segment. Homebuyers who act quickly are more likely to find great homes as soon as new residences hit the real estate market. Also, these homebuyers will be in an ideal position, one that enables them to check out a recently listed home quickly and make an offer without delay if a residence meets their needs. Study the real estate market carefully, and you'll be better equipped to make a move on a recently listed house faster than other homebuyers. Also, be sure to get pre-approved for a mortgage, as this will enable you to submit an offer without having to worry about committing extensive time and resources to get approved for a mortgage down the line. 2. Offer More Than the Asking Price. What can you do to ensure your offer stands out to a home seller? Offer more than the asking price for a residence, and you can improve your chances of securing your dream home. In the event that a home seller receives multiple offers for his or her residence, offering more than the initial asking price will help your offer stand out from others. Therefore, you'll be able to reduce the risk that you could miss out on your ideal house if you submit an offer that exceeds a home seller's asking price. 3. Work with an Experienced Real Estate Agent. When it comes to finding your dream home, why should you be forced to leave anything to chance? Instead, hire an experienced real estate agent, and you'll be able to enjoy a long-lasting competitive edge over other homebuyers. Typically, a real estate agent will possess extensive industry know-how and experience, ensuring that he or she can help you find your perfect residence immediately. This professional also will be ready to respond to any concerns or queries and ensure you are fully supported during every step of the homebuying process. From determining your ideal budget for a new home to setting up home showings, a real estate agent can make it easier for you to check out many wonderful residences in cities and towns nationwide. As a result, hiring a real estate agent could mean the difference between settling for an average house and discovering your dream residence in any real estate market. Gain the competitive edge you need in any real estate market, and you should be able to make an offer on your dream home instantly.

Categories: Uncategorized  

Posted by Peggy Farber on 2/7/2018

180 Robbins Hill Road , Brewster, MA 02631

Brewster (village)



Total Rooms
Full/Half Baths
Memories made, memories cherished in this home by the sea where the sound of the seagulls in the distance can be heard; where large family gatherings were a favorite. The place that owners ''loved the most in the world''. First time offered for sale for new memories, family gatherings and lazy days walking the famous Brewster tidal flats, to begin and just in time for summer of 2018! Highly desirable location, one lot back from the bay with bay beach access practically right out the door. Architect designed, custom built, featuring a traditional Cape front exterior with an open and contemporary interior. Exposed beams, vaulted ceilings, step down living room for cozy gatherings around the fireplace. Roomy first floor master suite, wood floors, walkout basement with bonus room. Needs updati
Open House
No scheduled Open Houses

Categories: New Homes  

Posted by Peggy Farber on 2/7/2018

When you’re buying a home, there’s a lot to think about. Your finances probably have the biggest impact in the entire home search process. The amount of a down payment you have and the amount of loan you’re approved for help decide what you can buy. 

When you hear about closing costs, what do they entail? How much will you need to cover these costs? Many people get to the closing table for their home purchase and feel unprepared. You’ll need a certain amount of cash on hand when you finally close on a home. Learn more about closing costs, so that you understand everything that you need to know about your home purchase.    

Closing costs are spelled out pretty plainly in just about every kind of real estate contract. These costs are the fees associated with the title companies, attorney, banks, lenders and everyone else who is involved in the purchase of a home. The closing table is also the time when you provide your sizable down payment. The closing costs that are being referred to are considered a separate expense independent of the closing costs.

Closing Costs Vary

Closing costs can range from anywhere between 2 and 8 percent of the purchase price of the home. You can’t really “choose” what’s included in the closing, so you’ll need to have an idea of how much money you’ll need to write a check for. Lenders can give you an estimate of about how much closing costs will be. 


Certain things like the realtor’s commission fees can be negotiated and can be paid for by the buyer or the seller. The good news is that you can roll your closing fees in with your mortgage in some cases. You may also be able to negotiate with your lender to pay the closing costs for you in exchange for a higher interest rate. 

What’s Included In Closing Costs?

Depending upon where and what type of home you’re buying, what the closing costs actually cover varies. Here’s just some of the things that closing costs cover:

  • Appraisal
  • Escrow fees
  • Credit reports
  • Title search
  • Title exam fee
  • Survey fee
  • Courier fee (Most transactions are done electronically, but in some cases this may be necessary)
  • Title insurance
  • Owner’s title insurance
  • Natural hazards disclosure
  • Homeowner’s insurance (Your first year of insurance is often paid at closing)
  • Buyer’s attorney fee
  • Lender’s attorney fee
  • Transfer taxes
  • Recording fees
  • Processing fees
  • Underwriting fee
  • Pre-paid interest
  • Pest inspections
  • Homeowner's association transfer fees
  • Special assessments

These fees vary widely by state and the type of property that you’re purchasing. Not every fee is required, but the above is just a list of many of the possible fees that could be included in on the closing of the home you choose.